Remains of the Tau Army fell into our hands. Even though the miniatures aren’t in their best condition, we decided to do the very first colour scheme. It isn’t the best option to test something, but we can’t waste the material we already own.
We had to see how the Scalecolor colours worked on them so we could find an alternative for Vallejo paints, whose colours didn’t convice us enough, and Citadel. It finally was a success to try these new paints, making Scalecolor a very interesting alternative to our previous options.
Going back to Tau Soldier, the colour scheme for Taros Campaign looks like Codex’s classic one. Taros is a desertic world, and we thought that a camouflage in yellow tones would perfectly fit in.

The ‘new’ Tau in Warhammer 40k and in our hands.

 

We had to see how the Scalecolor colours worked on them so we could find an alternative for Vallejo paints, whose colours didn’t convice us enough, and Citadel. It finally was a success to try these new paints, making Scalecolor a very interesting alternative to our previous options.
Going back to Tau Soldier, the colour scheme for Taros Campaing looks like Codex’s classic one. Taros is a desertic world, and we thought that a camouflage in yellow tones would perfectly fit in.

Something that hasn’t ever convinced us about Taus is the monochrome countenance. That’s why the lower part of the head has been degraded into a fleshy colour. It was an interesting result and we thought of applying it in the whole Fire Breed.

We’ve got into some trouble with the armour. It hasn’t absolutely convinced us the wasted effect. We hadn’t done it before and we think it hasn’t turned out good to make it the paint standard in this fighting force.
But we liked a lot the waste effects on the Bruno Rizzo’s Tau Army we showed you a few days ago, even though they could be too much for the style of painting we are looking for. We hope to substantially improve the armour on the next ones we do.
What do you think?